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Trees and Shrubs for Acid Soils

ID

430-027 (HORT-115P)

Authors as Published

Bonnie Appleton, Extension Specialist, Hampton Roads AREC; Robert Heins, Graduate Student, Hampton Roads AREC; Stephen Donohue, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences; Gregory Eaton, Horticulture; Dawn Alleman, Norfolk VCE; Jim Williams, Hampton VCE; Reviewed by David Close, Consumer Horticulture and Master Gardener Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech

    Cover, Trees and Shrubs for Acid Soils

This publication is available in PDF format only.

The trees and shrubs on your new home site are growing poorly, so you take samples to the Extension office and the agent suggests a soil test. Test results show that your soil has a pH of 4.5, which is rated as strongly acid. The agent suggests you either take corrective action to raise the pH or grow different plants. What do the test results mean? What are “acid soils” and what does pH measure? Why does this matter to your plants? How can you correct the situation or what alternative trees and shrubs can you grow?

Rights


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, re-print, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Publisher

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Jewel E. Hairston, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg.

Date

April 8, 2015