Resources by D. Ames Herbert

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
2011 Virginia Peanut Production Guide Jan 12, 2011 2810-1017
Insect Pest Management in Virginia: Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean 2010 May 1, 2009 2812-1027
Catalpa Sphinx Caterpillar
Catalpa sphinx caterpillars, also known as “Catalpa worms”, are major defoliators of catalpa, their only host. With their chewing mouthparts, they strip away large portions of the leaves. In heavy infestations they can completely defoliate the entire tree. Apparently trees on high ground with poor soil are rarely, if ever, attacked. In some years, depending on the region, many trees will have all their leaves stripped away by the end of the summer. This may be followed by years with no defoliation observed at all. The fluctuation between outbreak and no defoliation is largely due to the activity of parasites.
Nov 14, 2014 2911-1421 (ENTO-88NP)
Locust Leafminer Mar 17, 2016 3101-1528 (ENTO-205NP)
Monitoring and Management of Beet Armyworm and Other Rind-feeding Larvae in Watermelon Apr 21, 2011 3104-1540
No-Tillage Small Grain Production in Virginia May 1, 2009 424-005
Growing Hulless Barley in the Mid-Atlantic May 1, 2009 424-022
Growing Bread Wheat in the Mid-Atlantic Region May 1, 2009 424-024
Agronomy Handbook, 2000 May 1, 2009 424-100
Aphids in Virginia Small Grains: Life Cycles, Damage and Control
Four species of aphids attack small grains in Virginia — greenbug, corn leaf aphid, bird cherry-oat aphid, and English grain aphid. In general, these aphids are small pear-shaped insects (1/16 to 1/8 inch long) that are green to nearly black, or sometimes pinkish in color. Immature aphids look just like adults except smaller. Both winged and wing-less forms can occur in the same colony. All grain aphids have a pair of conicles, tailpipe-like projections, on the top side of the tail end. Aphids feed singly or in colonies on upper and lower leaf surfaces and stems. They feed near plant bases when plants are young or during cold weather, and on upper-canopy leaves, stems, and even grain heads later in the season.
Nov 13, 2014 444-018
Winter Grain Mite
The adult is relatively large compared to other spider mites and is the only mite of economic importance with the anal pore (a tan to orange spot best seen with microscope, but can be seen with a hand lens) on the upper surface of the abdomen.
Nov 13, 2014 444-037
Integrated Pest Management Peanut Scouting Manual
In the competitive global peanut market, you need to lower production costs. At the same time, you also need to keep pesticide residues in peanuts to a minimum; protect rivers, streams, and lakes from runoff; and prevent chemicals from leaching through the soil to groundwater. Using IPM to protect crops only from pests that are likely to cause economic losses is a good way to meet these goals.
Nov 13, 2014 444-126
Identifying Soybean Fields at Risk to Leaf-Feeding Insects May 1, 2009 444-203
Cereal Leaf Beetle, Biology and Management
Cereal leaf beetle, a native to Europe and Asia, was first detected in Michigan in 1962. Since that time it has spread throughout most of the mid-western and eastern United States and has become a significant pest of Virginia and North Carolina small grains. This insect can become very numerous in small grain fields and the larvae are capable of reducing grain yield by eating the green leaf tissue.
Nov 13, 2014 444-350
The Peanut Southern Corn Rootworm Advisory
The southern corn rootworm (SCR) has long been considered a major pest of peanuts in North Carolina and Virginia. However, researchers and Extension faculty at Virginia Tech and NC State have determined through more than 400 commercial field trials that the majority of peanut fields do not need to be treated. They have developed and tested a simple-to-use advisory that identifies those fields not at risk for pod damage or economic loss. The Southern Corn Rootworm Advisory can save you time and money as well as help you use insecticides more efficiently.
Nov 13, 2014 444-351
Field Guide to Stink Bugs
Field Guide to Stink Bugs of Agricultural Importance in the United States
Nov 17, 2014 444-356 (ENTO-68)
Second Edition Mid-Atlantic Guide to the Insect Pests and Beneficials of Corn, Soybean, and Small Grains Oct 4, 2012 444-360
Managing Stink Bugs in Cotton: Research in the Southeast Region Sep 23, 2009 444-390
Corn Earworm Biology and Management in Soybeans
Corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, is the most common and destructive insect pest of soybeans grown in Virginia. Although infestation severity varies, about one-third of our acreage is treated annually. This costs farmers 1.5 to 2 million dollars annually, and requires the application of many pounds of insecticide to crop lands. We may never eliminate this pest from Virginia soybeans, but knowledge of the biology and use of best management practices can help limit insecticide controls to those fields that meet economic threshold criteria. This publication provides current information on corn earworm biology, prediction of outbreaks, pest advisories, scouting procedures, and recently revised economic thresholds.
Nov 13, 2014 444-770
IMPACT: Virginia Potato Disease Advisory Impact
Potatoes are a major food crop on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, with average annual cash receipts of $14 million (2011-13).
Nov 13, 2014 ANR-105P
2009-2011 Performance of Sorghum Hybrids in the Virginia-Carolina Region
Based on data from the U.S. Grain Council (www.grains.org), grain sorghum is the third most important cereal crop grown in the United States and the fifth most important cereal crop grown in the world. The United States, with approximately 9.7 million acres harvested in the 2009-10 cropping season, is the world’s largest producer of grain sorghum, followed by India and Nigeria. Sorghum production in the U.S. is concentrated in the central and southern plains of five states — Kansas, Texas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Missouri — representing approximately 89 percent of total production. In many parts of the world, sorghum has traditionally been used for food. In the United States, sorghum is primarily used for animal feed, but also for food and industry derivatives such as wallboard and biodegradable packaging materials. Recently, sweet sorghums have been considered for bioenergy feedstock production.
Apr 25, 2013 AREC-11P
2017 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
The primary considerations when selecting peanut varieties are yield, grade factors, disease, pests, and drought and heat response. A good practice is recording for each field the variety, yield, rainfall, and disease and insect incidence every year. This will allow producers to identify the most productive and less problematic fields, also the most productive varieties for each field.
Feb 17, 2017 AREC-117NP
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2016
Proper soil fertility management ensures sufficient nutrients for maximum cotton production. Obtaining and maintaining appropriate soil nutrient concentrations is imperative, as fertilizer inputs are the largest component of production budgets for Virginia cotton farmers. At the same time, excessive nutrient application wastes money, wastes natural resources, and can negatively impact yields and environmental quality.
Feb 22, 2016 AREC-124NP (AREC-165NP)
IMPACT: Virginia Winter Fruit School Impact
Tree fruits are important to the agricultural economy in Virginia. The commonwealth ranks sixth in the nation in apple production, with a crop valued at more than $68 million, and 20th in peach production, with a crop valued at $4.5 million. Although smaller in acreage, cherries, pears, and plums also play an important role in some areas of Virginia. These fruit crops are susceptible to an everchanging array of insects, plant diseases, and weeds, and pest management programs are complex and knowledge-intensive.
May 13, 2015 AREC-135NP
2016 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
Recommendations for the use of agricultural chemicals are included in this publication as a convenience to the reader. The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this publication does not imply endorsement by Virginia Tech nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current regulations and conforms to the product label. Be sure to obtain information about usage regulations and examine a current product label before applying any chemical.
Jan 28, 2016 AREC-157NP
2016 Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean Jan 20, 2017 AREC-200NP
Troubleshooting The Soybean Crop Nov 16, 2012 AREC-25NP
2012 Performance of Sorghum Hybrids in Virginia Nov 26, 2012 AREC-30NP
2012 Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean Jan 28, 2013 AREC-37NP
Biology and Management of Hessian Fly in the Southeast Feb 27, 2013 AREC-39P (ANR-1069)
2014 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
The primary considerations when selecting peanut varieties are yield, grade factors, disease, pests, and drought and heat response. A good practice is recording for each field the variety, yield, rainfall, and disease and insect incidence every year. This will allow producers to identify the most productive and less problematic fields, also the most productive varieties for each field.
May 2, 2014 AREC-58NP
2013 Insect Pest Management In Virginia Cotton, Peanut, Soybean, and Sorghum Dec 10, 2013 AREC-61NP
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2014
Proper soil fertility management ensures sufficient nutrients for maximum cotton production. Obtaining and maintaining appropriate soil nutrient concentrations is imperative, as fertilizer inputs are the largest component of production budgets for Virginia cotton farmers. At the same time, excessive nutrient application wastes money, wastes natural resources, and can negatively impact yields and environmental quality.
Feb 7, 2014 AREC-62NP
Soybean Insect Guide
Numerous kinds of insects can be found in soybeans. Most are beneficial or harmless, but some can cause yield loss and even crop failure if not controlled.
Feb 7, 2014 AREC-68NP
2011 Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean Feb 1, 2012 AREC-7
2014 Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton and Peanut Feb 9, 2015 ENTO-109NP
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Biology And Management In Mid-Atlantic Soybeans
The mission of the Delaware Soybean Board (DSB), Maryland Soybean Board (MSB), and Virginia Soybean Board (VSB) is to maximize the profitability of soybean producers in their respective states by investing soybean checkoff funds in targeted domestic and international research, promotion and communication initiatives. The volunteer farmer- leaders who serve on the DSB, MSB and VSB boards of directors invest your checkoff dollars in research to improve soybean production practices to make your farm more profitable and ensure the sustainability of Mid-Atlantic soybean production.
Nov 5, 2015 ENTO-168NP
Insect Pest Management in Virginia Cotton, Peanut, and Soybean 2015 Mar 8, 2016 ENTO-184NP