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Sean Malone

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Biology And Management In Mid-Atlantic Soybeans

The mission of the Delaware Soybean Board (DSB), Maryland Soybean Board (MSB), and Virginia Soybean Board (VSB) is to maximize the profitability of soybean producers in their respective states by investing soybean checkoff funds in targeted domestic and international research, promotion and communication initiatives. The volunteer farmer- leaders who serve on the DSB, MSB and VSB boards of directors invest your checkoff dollars in research to improve soybean production practices to make your farm more profitable and ensure the sustainability of Mid-Atlantic soybean production.

This guide reviews the biology and threat of brown marmorated stink bug and management strategies in soybeans to help you continue to be successful in your soybean operation. DSB, MSB and VSB would like to thank the collaborating researchers from the University of Delaware, University of Maryland and Virginia Tech for contributing information and providing technical editing for this guide.

Nov 5, 2015 ENTO-168NP
Field Guide to Stink Bugs Nov 17, 2014 444-356 (ENTO-68)
Identifying Soybean Fields at Risk to Leaf-Feeding Insects


What is LAI? Leaf area index (LAI) is the ratio of leaf area to land area. Soybean requires LAI values of at least 3.5 to 4.0 by early to mid-reproductive developmental stages to achieve maximum yield for that year and environment. A soybean crop that does not achieve adequate LAI could be at risk to yield loss from insect leaf-feeders, whereas, fields with high (4+) LAI can sustain significant insect feeding with little to no effect on yield. This publication will aid producers in evaluating soybean fields at risk to yield reduction from leaf-feeding insects.

May 1, 2009 444-203
Monitoring and Management of Beet Armyworm and Other Rind-feeding Larvae in Watermelon

The following are categories of plants known to thrive in the southeastern/Hampton Roads area of
Virginia that also support bees. *Plants identified as major honey plants for bees

Apr 21, 2011 3104-1540
Second Edition Mid-Atlantic Guide to the Insect Pests and Beneficials of Corn, Soybean, and Small Grains Oct 4, 2012 444-360
Winter Grain Mite

Order: Acarina

Family: Penthaleidae

Species: Penthaleus major (Dugès)

Size: Adult, 1 mm long; eggs, .25 mm long..

Color: Adult is dark brown to almost black with red legs (Figs. 1 and 2); nymph is brownish with orange legs; a young larva is bright pink to orange but darkens to light brown after one day; freshly deposited eggs are smooth, kidney shaped, and reddish orange, but within minutes become wrinkled and after several days become a straw yellow color.

Description: The adult is relatively large compared to other spider mites and is the only mite of economic importance with the anal pore (a tan to orange spot best seen with microscope, but can be seen with a hand lens) on the upper surface of the abdomen.

Nov 13, 2014 444-037