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Matthew Yancey

Title Summary Date ID Author(s)
Characteristics of Common Western Virginia Trees Dec 15, 2014 420-351 (ANR-118NP)
Evaluation of Household Water Quality in Rockingham County, Virginia, August-September 2009, Virginia Household Water Quality Program Nov 29, 2010 3010-1515
Invasive Exotic Plant Species Identification and Management Mar 18, 2015 420-320(AREC-106P)
Invasive Exotic Plant Species: Ailanthus (Ailanthus altissima) May 4, 2015 420-322(ANR-122P)
Invasive Exotic Plant Species: Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata)

Autumn olive was introduced to the U.S. from Japan and China in 1830. It was originally planted for wildlife habitat, shelterbelts, and mine reclamation, but has escaped cultivation. It is dispersed most frequently by birds and other wildlife, which eat the berries.

Dec 3, 2014 420-321 (ANR-123P)
Invasive Exotic Plant Species: Honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.) Jan 20, 2015 420-323(ANR-124P)
Measuring Site Index
Site index (SI) is a measurement commonly used by foresters to describe the productivity of a site. Typically this measurement is used to describe sites growing well-stocked even-aged forests. Site index is the average height of the dominant1 and codominant2 trees on the site, at a given age (base age). Typically, the base age for hardwoods and white pine in Virginia is 50 years, while the base age for loblolly pine is 25 years. For example, a SI of 75, base age 50, means that the average height of the dominant and codominant trees on a site will be 75 feet when they are 50 years old (SI50=75). The higher the SI, the higher the site productivity (trees will grow faster than on a site with a lower SI).
Dec 3, 2014 2812-1028 (ANR-125NP)
Tips for Profitable Variety Selection: How to Use Data From Different Types of Variety Trials

Selecting an appropriate, high-yielding variety is one of the most important management decisions that producers make. Yield potential is clearly important, but the decision is complicated by such factors as the cropping system, the need for disease resistance, end-use quality goals, year-to-year climatic variation, and the need to select multiple varieties in order to reduce risk by spreading out flowering and maturity dates.

Jul 29, 2011 424-040