Resources for Fruits & Vegetables

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Tools to More Efficiently Manage In-Season Corn Nitrogen Needs Sep 2, 2009 2909-1410
Corn Earworm on Vegetables Mar 22, 2011 3103-1537
Planning the Vegetable Garden
How much time will you be able to devote to your garden on a regular basis? The answer to this question will dictate the size of your garden. You must remember that, once planted, the garden will have to be weeded once a week, irrigated during droughts, and vegetables harvested when ripe. Depending on the type of vegetables, you may also need to undertake pest control measures.
Dec 11, 2015 426-312 (HORT-209P)
Asparagus Mar 6, 2015 426-401(HORT-152P)
Beans Apr 16, 2015 426-402 (HORT-145P)
Cole Crops or Brassicas Apr 21, 2015 426-403 (HORT-156P)
Sweet Corn Mar 16, 2015 426-405 (HORT-151P)
Cucumbers, Melons and Squash
Varieties include both the slicer or fresh salad type and the pickle type (which can also be used fresh); vined, dwarfvined and bush varieties; all female or all-female seedless (no pollination required); burpless; and, various mixtures of these characteristics. Disease resistance is available in many varieties.
Mar 16, 2015 426-406 (HORT-147P)
Leafy Green Vegetables
Lettuce, a cool-season vegetable crop, is one of the easiest to grow. Lettuce withstands light frost; however, sunlight and high summer temperatures usually cause seedstalk formation (bolting) and bitter flavor. Slow-bolting or heat-resistant varieties are available and are recommended for extending the lettuce-growing season.
Mar 16, 2015 426-408 (HORT-148P)
Onions, Garlic, and Shallots
Onions are often grouped according to taste. The two main types of onions are strong flavored (American) and mild (often called European). Each has three distinct colors, yellow, white, and red. In general, the American onion produces bulbs of smaller size, denser texture, stronger flavor, and better keeping quality than European types. Globe varieties tend to keep longer in storage.
Mar 16, 2015 426-411(HORT-143P)
Potatoes, Peppers and Eggplant Apr 16, 2015 426-413 (HORT-146P)
Tomatoes
Tomatoes are valuable garden plants in that they require relatively little space for large production. Each standard tomato plant, properly cared for, yields 10 to 15 pounds or more of fruit.Diane Relf, Retired Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech Alan McDaniel, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech Ronald Morse, Former Associate Professor, Horticulture, Virginia Tech Reviewed by John Freeborn, Assistant Master Gardener Coordinator, Horticulture, Virginia Tech
Sep 29, 2016 426-418 (HORT-288P)
Sprouting Seeds For Food Jun 1, 2017 426-419 (HORT-154P)
Herb Culture and Use Nov 11, 2011 426-420
Root Crops Mar 5, 2015 426-422 (HORT-150P)
Vegetables Recommended for Virginia May 1, 2009 426-480
Integrated Pest Management for Vegetable Gardens May 1, 2009 426-708
Small Fruit in the Home Garden
As a general rule, plant selection and production area in a home garden should be limited to what you can properly care for. It is better to have a small, welltended planting area rather than a large, neglected one. Small fruits offer certain advantages over fruit trees for home culture because small fruits require less space for the amount of fruit produced, and they bear fruit one or two years after planting. Success with small-fruit planting will depend on the attention given to all phases of production, including crop and variety selection, site selection, soil management, fertilization, pruning, and pest management.
Oct 13, 2016 426-840 (HORT-216P)
Tree Fruit in the Home Garden
It is desirable to locate the fruit planting as close to your home as possible. Where space is limited, fruit trees may be set in almost any location suitable for ornamental plants. Consider the mature size of the tree when designing the planting.
Feb 11, 2015 426-841 (HORT-101P)
Nitrogen Management for White Potato Production Sep 28, 2009 438-012
Pest Management Guide: Field Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-016 (ENTO-221P)
Pest Management Guide: Horticultural and Forest Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-017 (ENTO-222P)
Pest Management Guide: Home Grounds and Animals, 2017
This 2017 Virginia Pest Management Guide provides the latest recommendations for controlling diseases, insects, and weeds for home grounds and animals. The chemical controls in this guide are based on the latest pesticide label information at the time of writing. Because pesticide labels change, read the label directions carefully before buying and using any pesticide. Regardless of the information provided here, always follow the latest product label instructions when using any pesticide.
Mar 15, 2017 456-018 (ENTO-220P)
IMPACT: Virginia Winter Fruit School Impact
Tree fruits are important to the agricultural economy in Virginia. The commonwealth ranks sixth in the nation in apple production, with a crop valued at more than $68 million, and 20th in peach production, with a crop valued at $4.5 million. Although smaller in acreage, cherries, pears, and plums also play an important role in some areas of Virginia. These fruit crops are susceptible to an everchanging array of insects, plant diseases, and weeds, and pest management programs are complex and knowledge-intensive.
May 13, 2015 AREC-135NP
Southeastern U.S. 2016 Vegetable Crop Handbook
New varieties and strains of particular varieties of vegetables are constantly being developed throughout the world. Since it is impossible to list and describe all of them, only some of the better performing commercial types are listed in the specific crop section, either alphabetically or in order of relative maturity from early to late. These varieties are believed to be suitable for commercial production under most conditions.
Feb 22, 2017 AREC-66NP (AREC-169NP)
Arthropod Pest Management Research on Vegetables in Virginia – 2011
This booklet summarizes more than 50 experiments of arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in Virginia in 2011. Experiments were primarily conducted at three Virginia Tech research stations: the Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center (ESAREC) near Painter, VA, the Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Extension Center (HRAREC) in Virginia Beach, VA and the Kentland Research Farm near Blacksburg, VA. All plots were maintained according to standard commercial practices.
Feb 1, 2012 ENTO-1
Benefits of an Insecticide Seed Treatment for Pumpkin Production in Virginia
In recent years cucurbit growers in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. could purchase their seeds pre-treated with the neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam. The insecticide seed treatment is currently packaged as FarMore F1400, which also includes three proven and complementary fungicides that provide the first line of defense against several key seed and seedling diseases including Rhizoctonia, Fusarium, Pythium, general damping-off and seedling blight.
Dec 21, 2015 ENTO-174NP
Stink Bugs Oct 13, 2017 ENTO-242NP
Performance of Insecticides on Brown Marmorated Stink Bug on Vegetables Dec 14, 2012 ENTO-28NP
What in the World? International Produce Takes a Stand at Virginia Farmers Markets May 25, 2016 HORT-225NP