Resources for On-Farm Food Safety

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Food Safety Modernization Act Produce Safety Rule: Worker Health, Hygiene and Training Jun 5, 2017 FST-278NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Farm Self-Help Form Jun 6, 2012 FST-35NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: On the Farm Jun 6, 2012 FST-36NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Land Use Jun 6, 2012 FST-37NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Water Use Jun 6, 2012 FST-38NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Manure Use Jun 6, 2012 FST-39NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Farm Worker Hygiene Jun 6, 2012 FST-40NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Farm Worker Toilet and Handwashing Facilities Jun 6, 2012 FST-41NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Harvesting and Storage Jun 6, 2012 FST-42NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Transporting Produce Safely Jun 6, 2012 FST-43NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Training and Certification Options Jun 6, 2012 FST-44NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Farmers Market Self-Help Form Jun 6, 2012 FST-45NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: At the Market Jun 6, 2012 FST-46NP
Enhancing The Safety of Locally Grown Produce: Keeping Food Safe in the Market Jun 6, 2012 FST-47NP
Virginia Cooperative Extension Healthy Meetings Initiative Nov 1, 2017 HNFE-478NP
GAPs and FSMA – an Overview for Hop Growers in Virginia
Food safety is a hot topic for hop growers and brewers. With multiple acronyms for various practices, standards, and regulations: GAPs, FSMA, PSR, PCR, and more; the confusion is understandable. Let’s examine where the small-acreage hop grower fits in. This fact sheet serves as an orientation to these standards,regulations, and practices as they may apply to hops; it is in no way a complete set of guidelines or substitute for training.
Dec 20, 2016 HORT-237NP
A Guide to the Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Certification Process Jul 5, 2017 HORT-252NP
Guide to Identifying Food Safety Hazards in Greenhouse Systems
According to the United States Department of Agriculture 2012 Census of Agriculture, sales from greenhouse-grown food crops equaled around $800 million in the U.S. Crops grown included tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, peppers, and berries, with hydroponic production operations making up about 64% of the total production (cwt) (USDA Census of Agriculture, 2012). Demand for greenhouse-grown produce continues to increase, providing growers with unique opportunities to tap into this expanding market. Although greenhouse systems provide a more protected environment than field-grown systems, it is important to understand the unique food safety risks and possible sources of contamination when growing produce in these systems. Identifying food safety hazards are necessary to implementing practices that reduce the risk of contamination during the pre-plant, production, harvest, and post-harvest handling stages. Use the checklist below to guide you in asking important questions targeting possible risks at each of the greenhouse system stages.
Jul 10, 2017 HORT-254NP
Accessing Virginia’s Regional Wholesale Market Sector: Fresh Produce Food Safety Considerations Nov 17, 2017 HORT-217NP
Accessing Virginia’s Market Sectors: Fresh Produce Purchasing Considerations Nov 17, 2017 HORT-272NP
Accessing Virginia’s Restaurant Market Sector: Fresh Produce Food Safety Considerations Nov 17, 2017 HORT-274NP