Resources for Fruits

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Managing Plant Diseases with Biofungicides Jul 17, 2009 2906-1298
Cucumber Beetle Management in Melons Jul 21, 2009 2906-1303
Notes on Harvesting and Handling Melons Jul 21, 2009 2906-1308
New Primocane Raspberry Experiences and Potentials - Update for Year 2002 Jul 23, 2009 2906-1321
Weed Management in Small Fruit Crops Jul 24, 2009 2906-1327
Weed Management Update in Small Fruit Jul 24, 2009 2906-1328
Stinger Registered For Virginia-Grown Strawberries Jul 28, 2009 2906-1346
Potential for Vegetables During the Strawberry Season Aug 4, 2009 2906-1365
Specialty Muskmelons Aug 7, 2009 2906-1372
Specialty Crop Profile: Blueberries for the Upper Piedmont and Mountain Regions - Part 2 Aug 11, 2009 2906-1380
Frost/Freeze Protection in Strawberries Aug 17, 2009 2906-1386
Off-season Management Tasks and Considerations for Selected Small Fruit Crops Aug 17, 2009 2906-1390
Growing Pears in Virginia
Pears are the second most important deciduous tree fruit after apple, and it has been grown in Europe since prehistoric times. Pears belong to the genus Pyrus and probably originated near the Black and Caspian Seas. French and English colonists brought pears to America and the first record of pears in the North America was in Massachusetts in 1630. Although pear is a popular fruit, it is not grown as widely as apple. Pears can be grown throughout much of North America because they tolerate a wide range of climatic conditions.
Feb 19, 2015 422-017 (HORT-97P)
Growing Cherries in Virginia
Cherries are grown in many parts of the world, but they have never gained the popularity in North America that they have in Europe and the Middle East. Cherries probably originated in the region between the Caspian and Black Seas, where trees still grow in the wild.
Feb 26, 2015 422-018 (HORT-166P)
Growing Peaches & Nectarines in Virginia
An orchard is a long-term investment and careful planning is essential to ensure economic success. Establishing and maintaining a peach planting to bearing age (three years) costs about $3,500 per acre. Mistakes made at planting often cannot be corrected; other mistakes that can be corrected could seriously jeopardize the economic success of the orchard. Because profit margins for commercial fruit plantings are small, orchards should be established only under the most favorable conditions for success.
Feb 17, 2015 422-019 (HORT-96P)
Pruning Peach Trees
Annual pruning is a critical management practice for producing easily harvested, heavy crops of high quality peaches. However, pruning is not a substitute for other orchard practices such as fertilization, irrigation, and pest control. Pruning practices vary slightly in different regions of the United States, but have changed little in the East during the past 70 years. Although pruning may vary slightly for different varieties and localities, certain general practices should be followed. The successful pruner must understand the principles of plant growth, the natural growth habit of the tree, and how the tree will respond to certain types of pruning cuts. Improper pruning will reduce yield and fruit quality.
Jan 28, 2015 422-020 (HORT-93P)
Training and Pruning Apple Trees
Proper training and pruning of trees is a major component of a profitable apple orchard operation. Successful pruning is an art based upon scientific principles of tree growth and physiology and an experienced understanding of tree response to various pruning cuts and practices. Each tree is an individual and should be treated accordingly. Varieties differ in growth characteristics and response to pruning cuts, rootstocks, soil, and growing conditions. It is important that orchard designs, objectives, and goals be clearly defined and that pruning principles are developed accordingly. Mediumto high-density plantings require greater commitment to detailed training and pruning than low-density orchards and should not be attempted unless such a commitment is made.
Jan 30, 2015 422-021(HORT-94P)
Growing Apples in Virginia
Growing apples in the home garden can be an enjoyable and rewarding experience, but consistent production of high quality fruit requires knowledge of tree and fruit growth and a willingness to perform certain practices at the appropriate time. Virginia is on the southern fringe of the U. S. apple producing region. Most apple varieties produce the highest quality fruit when night-time temperatures are cool (less than 60°F) at harvest time. Apples grown under warmer conditions tend to be large, soft, poorly colored, and less flavorful than when grown under cooler conditions. Our warm humid summers are also conducive for infection of many diseases. For these reasons, the best Virginia apples are grown at elevations higher than 800 feet above sea level in the western part of the state. However, even apples grown in eastern Virginia usually have quality superior to apples purchased in the supermarkets.
Feb 16, 2015 422-023 (HORT-95P)
Training and Pruning Apple Trees in Intensive Orchards
Since the mid 1970s in the U. S., the number of apple trees per acre in new orchards has gradually been increasing. Orchard intensification is motivated by the desire to produce fruit early in the life of the orchard to rapidly recover establishment costs. Intensification is possible by using dwarfing rootstocks that control tree size, induce early cropping, and produce large quantities of fruit relative to the amount of wood produced.
Feb 24, 2015 422-024 (HORT-99P)
Physiology of Pruning Fruit Trees
Woody plants are pruned to maintain a desired size and shape and to promote a certain type of growth. Ornamental plants are pruned to improve the aesthetic quality of the plant, but fruit trees are pruned to improve fruit quality by encouraging an appropriate balance between vegetative (wood) and reproductive (fruiting) growth.
Feb 26, 2015 422-025 (HORT-98P)
1995 Apple Variety Evaluations
There are more than 2,000 apple varieties and new varieties are becoming available each year. Some apple varieties perform optimally under specific climatic conditions. Therefore, varieties must be evaluated in many geographical locations to determine adaptation to local conditions. Results from one such evaluation trial are presented in this bulletin. Fifty apple varieties on the dwarfing rootstocks M.9, MARK, or M.26 were planted in 1986 or 1988 near Blacksburg, Virginia. Blacksburg is located in the Allegheny mountains at 2,200 feet above sea level. All varieties were evaluated for at least three years.
Feb 24, 2015 422-760 (AREC-130P)
1988-1995 Apricot Variety Evaluations in Virginia
Many apricot varieties are available to tree fruit producers. Therefore, growers should become acquainted with characteristics of various varieties grown under Virginia climatic conditions. Currently, apricots are not produced commercially in the mid-Atlantic area because trees bloom early and are susceptible to spring frost. Flower buds are quite resistant to low winter temperatures and there are active apricot breeding programs in Ontario, New York, West Virginia, New Jersey, and Arkansas, as well as in California. If late-blooming productive varieties are planted on the most frost-free sites, and bloom delaying techniques are employed, Virginia fruit growers may be able to profitably produce limited acreages of high-quality apricots.
Feb 24, 2015 422-761 (HORT-100P)
Peach and Nectarine Varieties for Virginia
Peach and nectarine are both members of the genus and species Prunus persica, and probably differ by only a single gene for skin pubescence (hairs on the fruit surface). One probably originated as a mutation of the other, but we do not know which came first. The species originated in China and was taken by traders from there into Persia, Greece, Italy, and other temperate areas of Europe. Peach and nectarine varieties may have yellow or white flesh. In Virginia different varieties ripen over a wide range of dates, from early June until mid-September. Varieties also differ in fruit size, susceptibility to some diseases and susceptibility to low winter temperatures, chilling requirements, and fruit disorders such as fruit cracking and split-pit. Descriptions of some of these characteristics are included in the next section of this publication.
Feb 23, 2015 422-762 (AREC-128P)
A Longer Marketing Life for Blackberry and Raspberry Fruit
Caneberries, which include blackberries and raspberries, must be picked when the berries are ripe or nearly ripe to ensure quality. Their thin fruit skin, high respiration rate, and high ethylene production make these berries extremely susceptible to postharvest losses. Although both raspberries and blackberries are considered “soft” fruits, raspberries are slightly more perishable in nature. The raspberry fruit is susceptible to greater moisture loss and fungal infection because of its lack of an outer protective covering (cuticle) and the fact that the raspberry fruit is left with a cavity in the center when detached from the plant.
May 11, 2015 423-701(HORT-169P)
Hill System Plastic Mulched Strawberry Production Guide for Colder Areas May 1, 2009 438-018
Specialty Crop Profile: Blueberries May 1, 2009 438-103
Specialty Crop Profile: Pawpaw May 1, 2009 438-105
Specialty Crop Profile: Ribes (Currants and Gooseberries) May 1, 2009 438-107
Forced-Air Produce Cooler
Field heat removal from freshly harvested produce is critical for subsequent handling and storage. Heat removal should be done immediately after harvest to maximize storage potential of the produce. The longer heat removal is delayed, the shorter the shelf life. Force air cooling has been design to remove field heat to bring the produce temperature down to the storage temperature.
Jan 28, 2015 442-060 (AREC-118P)
Supermarkets as Alternative Market Outlets for Virginia-Grown Berries Jan 18, 2010 448-508
Brown Rot on Peach and Other Stone Fruits
Brown rot is one of the most destructive diseases of peach and nectarine in Virginia, and also occurs on other stone fruits such as apricot, cherry, and plum. When environmental conditions favor this disease, crop loss can be devastating.
Mar 25, 2015 450-721 (PPWS-64P)
Pest Management Guide: Field Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-016 (ENTO-221P)
Pest Management Guide: Horticultural and Forest Crops, 2017 Feb 17, 2017 456-017 (ENTO-222P)
2017 Spray Bulletin for Commercial Tree Fruit Growers
Integrated pest management (IPM) is the approach emphasized in this guide; some aspects of IPM are incorporated throughout, although this guide mainly deals with the chemical component of IPM. IPM combines biological control from predators with selective chemical application for maintaining pest populations below economic threshold levels. This approach requires that growers give careful consideration to the selection, application rate and timing of chemical sprays. The degree of integration achieved will vary according to the management ability, training and objectives of the orchardist. Inadequate monitoring or implementation of IPM practices will lead to unsatisfactory results. In order to encourage the biological control components of the program, growers must consider the toxicity of chemicals to predators (Table 9, page 59) in addition to their efficacy against fruit pests (Tables 7 and 8, pages 56-58).
Feb 22, 2017 456-419 (ANR-172P)
Commercial Chinese Chestnut Production in Virginia Sep 21, 2017 ANR-279P
IMPACT: Virginia Winter Fruit School Impact
Tree fruits are important to the agricultural economy in Virginia. The commonwealth ranks sixth in the nation in apple production, with a crop valued at more than $68 million, and 20th in peach production, with a crop valued at $4.5 million. Although smaller in acreage, cherries, pears, and plums also play an important role in some areas of Virginia. These fruit crops are susceptible to an everchanging array of insects, plant diseases, and weeds, and pest management programs are complex and knowledge-intensive.
May 13, 2015 AREC-135NP
Assessing the Economic Feasibility of Growing Specialized Apple Cultivars for Sale to Commercial Hard Cider Producers
This publication describes a set of associated budget spreadsheets that utilize a systematic means to assess the feasibility of growing specialty apple cultivars for sale to commercial hard cider producers.
Sep 30, 2013 AREC-46P
A Guide to the Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Certification Process Jul 5, 2017 HORT-252NP
Mixed Infection of Strawberry Mottle Virus and Strawberry Mild Yellow Edge Virus in the Southeastern United States Oct 25, 2017 HORT-268P
Shoppers Guide for Berry Plants in the Mid-Atlantic and the Carolinas Sep 22, 2017 HORT-270NP