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Small Fruit in the Home Garden


426-840 (HORT-216P)

Authors as Published

Jayesh B. Samtani, Assistant Professor and Small Fruit Extension Specialist, Hampton Roads Agricultural Research and Extension Center; Reza Rafie, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia State University; Tony K. Wolf, Professor, Viticulture, Alson H. Smith Jr. Agricultural Research and Extension Center

    JPG-Small Fruit in the Home Garden

This publication is available in a PDF file format only.

As a general rule, plant selection and production area in a home garden should be limited to what you can properly care for. It is better to have a small, welltended
planting area rather than a large, neglected one. Small fruits offer certain advantages over fruit trees for home culture because small fruits require less space for the amount of fruit produced, and they bear fruit one or two years after planting. Success with small-fruit planting will depend on the attention given to all phases of production, including crop and variety selection, site selection, soil management, fertilization, pruning, and pest management.


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, reprint, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.


Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.


October 13, 2016