Resources for Community Planning

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
The Virginia GIS County Data Series May 1, 2009 303-104
Preparing for an Emergency: The Smart Thing to Do
Preparing for emergencies is not new. Your grandparents probably have extra supplies, such as: soap and shampoo in the bathroom closets, onions and potatoes stored in the basement, and canned goods on pantry shelves in their home. They understood the value of having a little extra on hand in case of emergencies.
Oct 1, 2014 3104-1590 (VCE-467NP/VCE-468NP)
Facilitator’s Guidebook - 2011, Community-Based Food System Assessment and Planning Jul 15, 2013 3108-9029 (CV-30NP)
Assessing Community Needs for Child Care May 1, 2009 350-056
Urban Forestry Issues
The U.S. population has grown increasingly urban each decade, from 28 percent in 1910 to 80 percent in 2000 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2002). In the Chesapeake watershed alone, residential development is predicted to consume 800,000 acres between 2003 and 2030, nearly 90 percent of it replacing farmland (Boesch and Greer, 2003). As urban communities grow larger and faster than ever before, natural resource management in these areas becomes crucial for achieving sustainable development and maintaining and enhancing the quality of life and the environment.
May 1, 2009 420-180
Value, Benefits, and Costs of Urban Trees May 1, 2009 420-181
Urban Stormwater: Terms and Definitions Sep 5, 2013 426-119 (BSE-78P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 2: Sheet Flow to Open Space
Sheet flow to open space (SOS) is a group of best management practices (BMPs) designed to disperse concentrated runoff to sheet flow into filter strips or a riparian buffer. An SOS reduces runoff volume and associated sediment and nutrients that are carried with it (see figure 1). It is used as a stormwater treatment practice in both urban and rural areas. This practice is often used after another treatment practice to disperse or eliminate runoff. In a few cases, an SOS can be used as a pretreatment to remove small amounts of sediment via a vegetated filter strip — prior to a bioretention device, for example.
Sep 6, 2013 426-121 (BSE-83P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 3: Grass Channels Sep 6, 2013 426-122 (BSE-88P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 4: Soil Restoration
Soil restoration (SR) is the technique of enhancing compacted soils to improve their porosity and nutrient retention. It includes biological (worms) and mechanical aeration, mechanical loosening (tilling), planting dense vegetation, and applying soil amendments. Soil amendments involve the spreading and mixing of mature compost into disturbed and compacted urban soils (see Figure 1).
Sep 6, 2013 426-123 (BSE-80P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 5: Vegetated Roofs
A vegetated roof (VR) is a best management practice (BMP) that reduces stormwater runoff and pollution. Vegetation and media create a permeable system on a previously impervious surface. The VR intercepts rainfall and filters runoff while reducing the volume and velocity. Vegetated roofs consist of a waterproofing barrier, drainage system, and engineered growing media. There are two types of VRs: intensive and extensive. Intensive vegetated roofs are deeper and heavier, while extensive vegetated roofs are shallower, lighter, and more common (see Figure 1). The type of VR determines the amount of maintenance necessary to maintain the vegetation.
Sep 6, 2013 426-124 (BSE-81P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 7: Permeable Pavement
Permeable pavement (PP) is a modified form of asphalt or concrete with a top layer that is pervious to water due to voids intentionally created during mixing. PPs include pervious concrete, porous asphalt, and interlocking concrete pavers. These materials are used as stormwater treatment practices in urban areas. They are used in place of traditionally impervious surfaces to allow infiltration and storage, thus reducing runoff (see figure 1).
Sep 6, 2013 426-126 (BSE-84P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 8: Infiltration Practices
Infiltration practices provide temporary surface and/or subsurface storage, allowing infiltration of runoff into soils. In practice, an excavated trench is usually filled with gravel or stone media, where runoff is stored in pore spaces or voids between the stones (see figure 1). These systems can reduce significant quantities of stormwater by enhancing infiltration, as well as provide filtering and adsorption of pollutants within the stone media and soils. Infiltration practices are part of a group of stormwater treatment practices, also known as best management practices (BMPs)
Mar 2, 2012 426-127 (BSE-85P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 10: Dry Swale
A dry swale (DS) is a shallow, gently sloping channel with broad, vegetated, side slopes. Water flow is slowed by a series of check dams (see figure 1). A DS provides temporary storage, filtration, and infiltration of stormwater runoff. Dry swales function similarly to bioretention, and are comparable to wet swales; however, unlike a wet swale, a DS should remain dry during periods of no rainfall. A DS is an engineered best management practice (BMP) that is designed to reduce pollution through runoff reduction and pollutant removal and is part of a site’s stormwater treatment practice (see figure 2).
Sep 6, 2013 426-129 (BSE-86P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 11: Wet Swale
A wet swale (WS) is an engineered, best management practice (BMP) arranged in a straight line that is designed to reduce stormwater pollution. A WS consists of a shallow, gently sloping channel with broad, vegetated, side slopes and slow flows (see figure 1). Wet swales typically stay wet because the bottom of the swale is below the water table. This is done to encourage the growth of wetland vegetation, providing water quality treatment similar to a natural wetland. This stormwater treatment practice also functions as part of the stormwater conveyance system. Wet swales have a relatively low capital cost; however, maintenance can be is intensive and expensive when compared to other BMPs.
Sep 9, 2013 426-130 (BSE-89P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 12: Filtering Practices
A stormwater filtering practice (FP) treats stormwater runoff by passing it through an engineered filter media consisting of either sand, gravel, organic matter, and/ or a proprietary manufactured product, collecting it in an underdrain, and then discharging the effluent to a stormwater conveyance system. FPs are stormwater treatment practices that are often obtained from the marketplace due to unique proprietary technologies (see figure 1).
Sep 9, 2013 426-131 (BSE-87P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 14: Wet Ponds
Wet ponds (WP) are ponds or lakes which provide treatment and storage of stormwater. The water depth is set by a structure known as an outlet structure. Wet ponds are probably the most well-known best management practice for treatment of stormwater. Because of their size, they are usually designed to include storage above the normal pool elevation. This added storage can provide reductions in downstream flooding and assist in protecting stream channels. They tend to be large; in some cases, they can become a passive community amenity (See Figure 1).
Sep 9, 2013 426-133 (BSE-79P)
Best Management Practice Fact Sheet 15: Extended Detention Ponds
Extended detention ponds (EDs) are dry detention ponds that provide 12 to 24 hours of runoff storage during peak runoff events (see figure 1). Releases from the ED ponds are controlled by an outlet structure. During a storm event, as the discharge restriction is reached, water backs up into the ED pond. The pool slows flow velocities and enables particulate pollutants to settle. Peak flows are also reduced. ED ponds have the lowest overall pollutant- removal rate of any stormwater treatment option, so they are often combined with other upstream, lowimpact development (LID) practices to better maximize pollutant-removal rates. Due to their placement at the exit point of the watershed, ED is often the last opportunity to treat stormwater before it is discharged to a stream. Because of its low treatment performance, an ED should be viewed as the treatment option of last resort.
Sep 9, 2013 426-134 (BSE-82P)
Foundations for a Successful Farmers Market Apr 27, 2010 448-502
Powell River Project - Stabilizing Reclaimed Mines to Support Buildings and Development Dec 2, 2009 460-130
Powell River Project - Reclaiming Mined Lands as Industrial Sites Dec 2, 2009 460-132
Virginia Master Naturalist
The Virginia Master Naturalist program is a statewide corps of volunteers providing education, outreach, and service dedicated to the beneficial management of natural resources and natural areas within their communities.
Oct 27, 2014 465-300 (ANR-117NP)
Extension Leadership Councils: Planning for Success Mar 25, 2010 490-394
Virginia Master Naturalist Program Strategic Planning Report 2015-2020
This report summarizes the findings from a strategic planning process conducted by the Virginia Master Naturalist program in 2013-2014. The process involved three steps: a comprehensive needs assessment to identify program needs, strategic planning workshops to identify initiatives for addressing those needs, and online voting to prioritize proposed initiatives.
Apr 9, 2015 ANR-137NP
Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service September 2015 Housing Commentary Part A: Current Data
The housing market typically slows this time of year. Thus we should look at upcoming data on a long-term basis and not by monthly data reports. September's housing data was truly mixed based on a monthly basis – permits, new sales, and construction spending all declined. Starts, existing sales, completions, and spending increased. On a regional perspective, the data was similar.
Dec 11, 2015 ANR-170NP
Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service September 2015 Housing Commentary Part B: Current Markets
The GDPNow model forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the fourth quarter of 2015 is 2.3 percent on November 18, unchanged from November 13. The forecast of real growth has remained at 2.3 percent after Tuesday's releases for October data on industrial production from the Federal Reserve Board, consumer prices (CPI) from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and this morning's release of October housing starts from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Dec 11, 2015 ANR-171NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service November 2015 Housing Commentary: Part A
November's housing data was predominately positive on a monthly and year-over-year basis. Most sectors improved with the exceptions of existing house sales and new housing completions. From a regional perspective, all data were mixed across sectors.
Jan 25, 2016 ANR-179NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service November 2015 Housing Commentary: Part B Jan 26, 2016 ANR-180NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service December 2015 Housing Commentary: A Feb 24, 2016 ANR-182NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service December 2015 Housing Commentary: Part B
“If current laws governing federal taxes and spending generally remained in place, by CBO’s projections, real GDP would grow by 2.7 percent this calendar year and by 2.5 percent in 2017, as measured by the change from the fourth quarter of the previous year. From 2018 through 2020, the economy would grow at an average annual rate of 2.0 percent, CBO projects.
Feb 25, 2016 ANR-183NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service February 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In February, housing was mixed. Total and single-family starts improved modestly month-over-month. Once again, aggregate housing permits were disappointing – total permits decreased month-over-month; single-family permits eked out a gain, and multifamily permits were decidedly negative. Housing under construction data indicated minimal increases and housing completions were negative. Total private and new single-family construction spending increased somewhat. New house sales exhibited some growth and existing sales were disappointingly negative.
Apr 29, 2016 ANR-189NP (ANR-196NP)
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service February 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The baseline scenario for the United States is a moderate economic expansion through the projection period. Real GDP grows at an average rate of 2! percent per year. The unemployment rate declines to 4! percent in the middle of 2017 and remains near that level through the end of the scenario period. CPI inflation rises to 2! percent at an annual rate by the middle of 2017 before dropping back to about 2 percent in the first quarter of 2018 and remaining near that level thereafter.
May 4, 2016 ANR-190NP (ANR-197NP)
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service October 2015 Housing Commentary: Section I Mar 24, 2016 ANR-191NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service March 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I May 17, 2016 ANR-202NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service March 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II May 17, 2016 ANR-203NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service April 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In April, aggregate housing data was positive, with new single-family housing exhibiting a surprisingly big increase. Yet, there are problematic cues – completions decreased month-over-month and year-over-year. Housing permits and starts also decreased year-over-year. Also challenging were total private residential and single-family construction spending declining month-over-month (Note, these are reported in nominal dollars). Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors. From the beginning of 2010, housing has improved. Nonetheless, most sectors of the housing market remain well less than their respective historical averages.
Jul 7, 2016 ANR-207NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service April 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
“The GDPNow model forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the second quarter of 2016 is 2.5 percent on June 1, down from 2.9 percent on May 31. After this morning's construction spending release from the U.S. Census Bureau and this morning's Manufacturing ISM Report On Business from the Institute for Supply Management, the forecast for real residential investment growth decreased from 7.9 percent to 4.2 percent, the forecast for real nonresidential structures investment growth decreased from -2.8 percent to -6.5 percent, and the forecast for real government spending growth decreased from 1.2 percent to 0.4 percent.” – Pat Higgins, Economist, The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Jul 7, 2016 ANR-208NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service May 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In May, aggregate housing data was mixed; with new single-family housing exhibiting declines in permits, starts, spending, and sales. Month-over-month data were lackluster as well, with the exception being total housing completions. Year-over-year total housing permits and completions are now negative. Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors. From the depths of 2009, housing has improved; yet, most sectors of the housing market remain well less than their respective historical averages.
Jul 14, 2016 ANR-213NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service May 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The GDPNow model forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the second quarter of 2016 is 2.6 percent on July 1, down from 2.7 percent on June 29. The forecast for second-quarter real nonresidential structures investment growth increased from –7.3 percent to –4.2 percent after this morning's construction spending release from the U.S. Census Bureau. This was more than offset by declines in the forecasts of real residential investment growth from 1.7 percent to –3.7 percent and real state and local government expenditures growth from –0.4 percent to –1.1 percent after the same release.” – Pat Higgins, Economist, The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Jul 14, 2016 ANR-214NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service June 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In June, aggregate housing data was mostly positive; with only total starts and housing permits declining year-over-year. Single-family spending has decreased four consecutive months; multifamily 3 of 5; and remodeling 2 of 5. Completions and new single-family sales were the “Stars” of June. Reported construction spending was disappointing as well, as total residential and single-family expenditures declined month-over-month. Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors. From the depths of 2009, housing has improved; yet, most sectors of the housing market remain well less than their respective historical averages
Aug 11, 2016 ANR-218NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service June 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The final GDPNow model forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the second quarter of 2016 is 1.8 percent on July 28, down from 2.3 percent on July 27. After the U.S. Census Bureau's inaugural release of its advance economic indicators report, which covers retail and wholesale inventories and foreign trade in goods, the nowcast of the contribution of net exports to second-quarter real GDP growth declined from 0.17 percentage points to –0.10 percentage points and the nowcast of the contribution of inventory investment to growth declined from –0.63 percentage points to –0.79 percentage points
Aug 11, 2016 ANR-219NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service July 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In July, aggregate housing data were mixed; with several categories declining month-over-month and on a year-over-year basis. Seven categories recorded three percent or less increases. New single-family sales was the “Star” of July, increasing above its long-term historical average. In the expenditures category, single-family spending has decreased five consecutive months; remodeling expenditures increased month-over-month, yet are negative year-over-year. The Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects residential investment spending, in Q3, to decrease at a 5.1 percent rate1(SAAR). Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors. From the depths of 2009, housing has improved; yet, only new single-family sales are greater than its historical average.
Sep 15, 2016 ANR-223NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service July 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The GDPNowmodel forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the third quarter of 2016 is 3.3 percent on September 9, down from 3.5 percent on September 2. The forecasts of third-quarter real consumer spending growth and real equipment investment growth declined from 3.5 percent to 3.4 percent and from 3.3 percent to 2.0 percent, respectively, on Tuesday after the motor vehicle sales release from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Non-Manufacturing ISM Report On Business. The forecast of the contribution of inventory investment to third-quarter real GDP growth decreased from 0.62 percentage points to 0.57 percentage points after this morning's wholesale trade report from the U.S. Census Bureau.
Sep 15, 2016 ANR-224NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service August 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I-PDF
In August, aggregate monthly housing data, based on a month-over-month comparison, were decidedly negative. Total housing permits, new SF starts, and new private SF construction spending were and are problematic –in August they all were negative on a year-over-year basis. New single-family sales appear to be reverting to their recent average. In the expenditures category, private new single-family spending has decreased monthly since March. The October 7th Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects residential investment spending, in Q3, to decrease at a 7.7 percent rate1(SAAR). Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors.
Nov 15, 2016 ANR-229NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service August 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
In August, aggregate monthly housing data, based on a month-over-month comparison, were decidedly negative. Total housing permits, new SF starts, and new private SF construction spending were and are problematic –in August they all were negative on a year-over-year basis. New single-family sales appear to be reverting to their recent average. In the expenditures category, private new single-family spending has decreased monthly since March. The October 7th Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects residential investment spending, in Q3, to decrease at a 7.7 percent rate1(SAAR). Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors.
Nov 15, 2016 ANR-230NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service September 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In September, aggregate monthly housing data, based on a month-over-month comparison, were decidedly positive. Only housing starts and completions, were negative on a month-over-month and year-over-year basis. New single-family sales have edged lower for the past two-months. In the expenditures category, private new single-family spending increased for the first time since March; though keep in mind this was reported on a nominal basis. The November 9th Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects residential investment spending, in Q4, to decrease at a -4.9 percent seasonally adjusted annual rate1. Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors.
Nov 17, 2016 ANR-232NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service September 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II Nov 17, 2016 ANR-233NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service October 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In October, aggregate monthly housing data, based on a month-over-month comparison, were decidedly positive. New housing starts rebounded sharply from September. Yet, new single-family house sales were negative on a month-over-month and single-family construction spending was negative year-over-year. New single-family sales have been mixed for the past few months. The December 9th Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects aggregate residential investment spending to increase at a 10.7 percent seasonally adjusted annual rate; new residential investment spending was estimated to rise 12.4 percent; and improvements were projected to increase 4.3 percent in 2016.1 Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors.
Dec 19, 2016 ANR-237NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service October 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The GDPNow model forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the fourth quarter of 2016 is 2.6 percent on December 9, unchanged from December 6. The forecast of the contribution of inventory investment to fourth-quarter growth decreased from 0.46 percentage points to 0.42 percentage points after this morning's wholesale trade report from the U.S. Census Bureau
Dec 19, 2016 ANR-238NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service November 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In November, aggregate monthly housing data were mixed. Overall permits declined month-over-month and year-over-year and single-family permits declined month-over-month. New single-family house construction spending improved minimally on a month-over-month basis and year-over-year basis. The January 13th Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects aggregate residential investment spending increased at a 9.2 percent (seasonally adjusted annual rate); new residential investment spending was estimated at 9.5 percent; and improvements were projected 3.4 percent in 2016 (based on December 16 data).1Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors.
Feb 27, 2017 ANR-246NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service November 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The GDPNowmodel forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the fourth quarter of 2016 is 2.8 percent on January 13, down from 2.9 percent on January 10. The forecast of fourth-quarter real personal consumption expenditures growth ticked down from 2.6 percent to 2.5 percent after this morning's retail sales report from the U.S. Census Bureau.” –Pat Higgins, Economist, The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Feb 28, 2017 ANR-247NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest ServiceDecember 2016 Housing Commentary: Section I
In December 2016, aggregate monthly housing data were mixed. Overall permits declined month-over-month and in creased minimally year-over-year. Single-family permits declined month-over-month. New single-family house construction spending improved minimally on a month-over-month basis and year-over-year basis. The February 9th Atlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects aggregate residential investment spending to increase at a 5.3 percent seasonally adjusted annual rate in Quarter 1; new residential investment spending was estimated at 10.2 percent; and improvements were projected 3.3 percent.1 Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors.
Feb 27, 2017 ANR-250NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service December 2016 Housing Commentary: Section II
The GDPNowmodel forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the first quarter of 2017 is 2.7 percent on February 9, unchanged from February 7. The forecast for the contribution of inventory investment to first-quarter growth remained at -0.25 percentage points after this morning's wholesale trade report from the U.S. Census Bureau.” –Pat Higgins, Economist, The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
Feb 27, 2017 ANR-251NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest ServiceJanuary 2017 Housing Commentary: Section I Apr 3, 2017 ANR-258NP
The Virginia Tech –U.S. Forest Service January 2017 Housing Commentary: Section II Apr 3, 2017 ANR-259NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service March 2017 Housing Commentary: Section II May 23, 2017 ANR-270NP
Virginia Tech - U.S. Forest Service April 2017 Housing Commentary - Part A: Main
In April 2017, in aggregate, monthly housing data were decidedly negative on a month-over-month basis. Total and single-family (SF) permits and starts declined; yet SF starts increased. New SF and existing sales, and completions also decreased. Observing unadjusted data; permits, starts, and new SF sales were similar to April 2016. In fact, SF starts and new SF unadjusted sales were greater than April 2016. New SF house construction spending increased minimally month-over-month. Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors. The June 13thAtlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects aggregate residential investment spending to increase at a 5.8 percent seasonally adjusted annual rate for Quarter 2; both new residential investment and improvements spending were projected to increase (7.6 and 3.0 percent, respectively). All declined from Q1’s estimate.
Jul 7, 2017 ANR-275NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service April 2017 Housing Commentary: Section II
The GDPNowmodel forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the second quarter of 2017 is 3.0 percent on June 9, down from 3.4 percent on June 2. The forecast for second-quarter real GDP growth fell from 3.4 percent to 3.1 percent on June 5 after the U.S. Census Bureau's manufacturing report and the incorporation of motor vehicle sales estimates released by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis on the prior business day. The forecast of the contribution of inventory investment to second-quarter growth declined from 0.87 percentage points to 0.77 percentage points after this morning's wholesale trade report from the Census Bureau.
Jul 10, 2017 ANR-276NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service May 2017 Housing Commentary: Section I
The aggregate U.S. housing market hit a stumbling block in May, as most monthly indicators were negative on a month-over-month basis. However, on a year-over-year basis, the majority were positive, with the exception of total permits and starts. Problematic is construction spending, as single-family, multifamily, and improvement expenditures were negative on a month-over-month basis. These sub-sectors bear watching, as the continuation of this pattern may indicate a slowdown in the housing market. Regionally, data were mixed across all sectors. The July 11thAtlanta Fed GDPNow™ model projects aggregate residential investment spending to decrease at a -1.0% percent seasonally adjusted annual rate. New private housing was estimated to decline -2.5% and improvement spending was projected to increase 1.6% in Quarter 2. All declined from Q1’s forecasts.
Jul 18, 2017 ANR-282NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service May 2017 Housing Commentary: Section II Jul 19, 2017 ANR-283NP
The Virginia Tech - U.S. Forest Service June 2017 Housing Commentary - Part A: Main Aug 30, 2017 ANR-286NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service June 2017 Housing Commentary: Section II Aug 30, 2017 ANR-287NP
The Virginia Tech – U.S. Forest Service August 2017 Housing Commentary: Section I Oct 30, 2017 ANR-296NP
Household Water Quality in Floyd County, Virginia
In March 2013, residents from Floyd County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Aug 29, 2014 BSE-153NP
Household Water Quality in Goochland and Powhatan Counties, Virginia
In February 2013, residents from Goochland and Powhatan Counties participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 3, 2014 BSE-155NP
Household Water Quality in Halifax County, Virginia
In August 2013, residents from Halifax County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 3, 2014 BSE-156NP
Household Water Quality in Hanover County, Virginia
In April 2013, residents from Hanover County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program
Sep 3, 2014 BSE-157NP
Household Water Quality in Loudoun County, Virginia
In October 2013, residents from Loudoun County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 5, 2014 BSE-158NP
Household Water Quality in Montgomery County, Virginia
In March 2013, residents from Montgomery County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 5, 2014 BSE-159NP
Household Water Quality in New Kent and Charles City Counties, Virginia
In July 2013, residents from New Kent and Charles City Counties participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 5, 2014 BSE-160NP
Household Water Quality in Nottoway County, Virginia
In September 2013, residents from Nottoway County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 5, 2014 BSE-161NP
Household Water Quality in Pittsylvania County, Virginia
In October 2013, residents from Pittsylvania County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension(VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 5, 2014 BSE-162NP
Household Water Quality in Pulaski and Wythe Counties Virginia
In May 2013, residents from Pulaski and Wythe Counties participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 8, 2014 BSE-163NP
Household Water Quality in Roanoke County, Virginia
In May 2013, residents from Roanoke County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 8, 2014 BSE-164NP
Household Water Quality in Clarke County, Virginia
In June 2013, residents from Clarke County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 8, 2014 BSE-166NP
Household Water Quality in Shenandoah County, Virginia
In June 2013, residents from Shenandoah County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the localVirginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 8, 2014 BSE-167NP
Household Water Quality in Warren County, Virginia
In June 2013, residents from Warren County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 8, 2014 BSE-168NP
Household Water Quality in Page County, Virginia
In June 2013, residents from Page County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program. Erin Ling, Water Quality Extension Associate, and Brian Benham, Extension Specialist and Professor, Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Tech
Sep 8, 2014 BSE-169NP
Household Water Quality in Frederick County, Virginia
In June 2013, residents from Frederick County participated in a drinking water testing clinic sponsored by the local Virginia Cooperative Extension(VCE) office and the Virginia Household Water Quality Program.
Sep 9, 2014 BSE-170NP
How Do Stream Buffers Reduce the Offsite Impact of Pollution? Nov 3, 2017 BSE-38NP (BSE-216NP)
Denitrification Management Mar 27, 2013 BSE-54P
Denitrifying Bioreaders: An Emerging Best Management Practice to Improve Water Quality Apr 12, 2013 BSE-55P
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Insurance Factsheet Jul 27, 2012 CV-16NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: How Much Liability Insurance Coverage Should I Have? Jul 27, 2012 CV-17NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Conducting the Liability Assessment Jul 27, 2012 CV-18NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Questions to Ask when compairing insurance coverage Jul 30, 2012 CV-19NP
Understanding Virginia’s Planning Commissions Dec 20, 2011 CV-2
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Virginia Attorneys: Members of the American Agricultural Law Association Jul 30, 2012 CV-20NP
Community Engagement: Successes in Virginia Communities Oct 22, 2012 CV-22NP
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Workers' Compensation & Vendor Liability for Farmers' Market Owners and Operators Oct 29, 2012 CV-24NP
Managing Liability Jan 30, 2013 CV-25P
MANAGING LEGAL LIABILITY SERIES: Sources of Insurance Dec 10, 2012 CV-26NP
Community Engagement
A local leader, public official, or planner generates an idea and prepares to launch it into action. It soon becomes clear that a key ingredient is missing: the support and ideas of the impacted community. This scenario is not uncommon and is often associated with a plan that will fail.
Sep 10, 2014 CV-38P
FACILITATION SERIES: The Art of Flip Charting
The discussion has begun, and words are flowing from each person like the water in a rushing stream. These words must be captured and become the wallpaper plastered throughout the room. It is this process of flip charting that creates the visual summary of key discussion points and provides the group memory that supports the process of a facilitated conversation.
Dec 19, 2014 CV-44NP
Facilitation Series: The Things Facilitators Say . . . Feb 16, 2012 CV-6
New River Valley Agriculture & Agritourism Strategic Plan
For Giles, Montgomery, Pulaski, and Floyd Counties, agritourism and agribusiness are vehicles for increasing community wealth, providing a broader market base for locally produced products, and diversifying the mix of products and services available to visitors. The purpose of the New River Valley Agriculture and Agritourism Strategic Plan is two-fold: 1) gain a better understanding of what the current agriculture assets are in the community; and 2) develop a plan of work that will support and enhance agriculture and agritourism in the region.
Mar 24, 2016 CV-67NP
FACILITATION SERIES: Facilitating Group Discussions Generating & Narrowing Ideas and Planning for Implementation Mar 2, 2012 CV-7
Virginia Agritourism Conference: Agritourism in Virginia’s New Economy Apr 18, 2017 CV-79
FACILITATION SERIES: The Dynamics of Group Decision Making Mar 2, 2012 CV-8
NONPROFIT BOARD LEADERSHIP: Understanding the Role of a Board Member Mar 7, 2012 CV-9
Food Deserts in Virginia
In 2012, Delegate Delores McQuinn introduced House Joint Resolution 88 and then in 2013 reintroduced House Joint Resolution 646 to request that the Virginia General Assembly review the issue of food deserts in Virginia. The Honorable William Howell, Speaker of the House of Delegates of the Virginia General Assembly, commissioned Alan Grant, dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Virginia Tech, and Jewel Hairston, dean of the College of Agriculture at Virginia State University, to conduct a study of food deserts in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
Jan 22, 2014 VCE-294NP
Basic First-Aid Supplies
Being Prepared helps families alleviate fears and reduce potential losses related to disasters. In the event of emergencies or disasters, injured people need to receive help within the first hour of the incident. Often family members and co-workers are the initial first responders. First-aid kits are a necessity for attending to victims and should be kept in homes, vehicles, schools and workplaces.
Jun 24, 2014 VCE-409NP
Biological & Chemical Terrorism
Terrorism is the use of force or violence against people or property in violation of the criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion or ransom.
Jun 24, 2014 VCE-410NP
Child Emergency Preparedness
Children and Disasters: Disasters can leave children feeling frightened, confused and insecure. Children may respond to disaster by demonstrating fears, sadness or behavioral problems. Younger children may return to earlier behavior patterns, such as bedwetting, sleep problems and separation anxiety. Older children also may display anger, aggression, school problems or withdrawal. Some children who have only indirect contact with the disaster but witness it on television also may develop distress. Whether a child has personally experienced trauma, has merely seen the event on TV or has heard it discussed by adults, parents and teachers should be informed and ready to help if reactions to stress begin to occur.
Jun 24, 2014 VCE-411NP
Earthquakes
Earthquakes are sudden slips along a geological fault and the resulting ground shaking and radiated seismic energy caused by the slip or by volcanic activity or other sudden stress changes in the earth.
Jun 25, 2014 VCE-412NP
Floods
Floods are one of the most common hazards in the United States. A flood is defined as any high flow, overflow or inundation by water that causes or threatens damage. Flood effects can be local, impacting a neighborhood or community, or very large, affecting entire river basins and multiple states. Each year coastal, estuarine, riverine, overland and flash flooding places thousands of people, pets and livestock at risk of serious injury and death, and destroys property and infrastructure costing valued at billions of dollars.
Jun 25, 2014 VCE-413NP
Pet Preparedness
Pets often are an important part of people’s lives. If you are like many animal owners, your pet is an important member of your family. The likelihood that you and your animals will survive emergencies or disasters such as a fire, earthquake, flood, tornado or terrorist attack depends largely on emergency planning. Because animals can influence a person’s decision to take protective actions, understand how to manage animals in emergencies.Create fear among the public.
Jul 10, 2014 VCE-414NP
Tornadoes
Tornadoes are violently rotating columns of air with circulation that reaches the ground. Tornadoes usually start as a funnel cloud and are accompanied by a loud, roaring noise.
Jul 10, 2014 VCE-415NP
Preparing for an Emergency: Make a Family Emergency Kit
Preparing for emergencies is not new. Your grandparents probably have extra supplies, such as: soap and shampoo in the bathroom closets, onions and potatoes stored in the basement, and canned goods on pantry shelves in their home. They understood the value of having a little extra on hand in case of emergencies. All states and counties have experienced disasters. Virginian’s have experienced ice storms, thunder storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and power outages. It is wise to be prepared for the unexpected.
Sep 1, 2014 VCE-486NP