Resources for Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Cotton
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. One Palmer amaranth per 30 foot of row can reduce cotton yield by 6 to 12%.
Mar 25, 2015 2805-1001 (PPWS-60NP)
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Soybean
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. One Palmer amaranth per meter of row can reduce soybean yield 32%.
Jun 1, 2016 2808-1006 (PPWS-78NP)
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2007 May 1, 2009 2810-1016
2011 Virginia Peanut Production Guide Jan 12, 2011 2810-1017
Cabbage Webworm May 1, 2009 2811-1022
Wireworm Pest Management in Potatoes May 1, 2009 2812-1026
Bt Sweet Corn: What Is It and Why Should We Use It? Jul 17, 2009 2906-1300
Cucumber Beetle Management in Melons Jul 21, 2009 2906-1303
Seed-Piece Treatments for Insect Control in Potatoes Jul 21, 2009 2906-1310
Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Jul 24, 2009 2906-1326
Scouting for Wireworms before Planting Vegetables Jul 24, 2009 2906-1329
Controlling Bean Leaf Beetle on Snap Beans Jul 16, 2009 2906-1332
Insecticide Label Updates Jul 27, 2009 2906-1337
Management of Aphids in Spinach Jul 27, 2009 2906-1338
A Powerful New Insecticide for the Organic Grower Jul 27, 2009 2906-1340
Chemical Control of European Corn Borer in Bell Pepper Jul 29, 2009 2906-1355
Sampling for European Corn Borer in Bell Pepper Jul 30, 2009 2906-1356
Cruiser 5FS: Supplemental Label for Use on Edible Beans Jul 30, 2009 2906-1357
Evaluating Vegetable Transplants Apr 24, 2015 2906-1358 (AREC-140P)
Reduction in Sediment Movement in Plasticulture Aug 4, 2009 2906-1369
A Summary of Recent Pesticide Registrations and Other Updates (Extracted from the Virginia Crop Pest Advisory Newsletter) Aug 10, 2009 2906-1373
Potato Seed Selection and Management
Selection of good quality seed is essential for Virginia growers. We often plant under less than ideal growing conditions in cold, wet soils. Seed need to be disease-free, physiologically young, handled gently and stored with care. Select disease-free seed lots. Commercial lots of seed must be inspected upon arrival by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Inspection Service. Avoid planting seed pieces with scab lesions as seed-borne scab can contaminate fields without a prior history of scab.
Apr 27, 2015 2906-1391 (HORT-172NP)
Use of In-furrow Fungicide Treatments and Seedpiece Dusts for Disease Control in White Potato Aug 18, 2009 2906-1394
Japanese Beetle Pest Management in Primocane-Bearing Raspberries Sep 15, 2009 2909-1411
Proceedings of the 31st Southern Conservation Agricultural Systems Conference Dec 3, 2009 2910-1417
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2008 Nov 19, 2009 2911-1420
Common Diseases of Soybean in the Mid-Atlantic Region Feb 17, 2010 3001-1435
Corn Fertility Update – Spring 2010 Jun 11, 2010 3006-1448
Soybean Rust Incidence and the Response of Soybeans to Fungicides in 2009 Dec 21, 2010 3012-1520
Arthropod Pest Management Research on Vegetables in Virginia – 2010
This booklet contains arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in eastern Virginia in 2010.
Feb 22, 2011 3102-1532
Growing Hulless Barley in the Mid-Atlantic May 1, 2009 424-022
Cotton Harvest Aid Selection and Application Timing May 1, 2009 424-201
Defoliating Cotton under Adverse Conditions: Drought-stress, Cool Temperatures, and Rank Growth May 1, 2009 427-208
Nitrogen Management for White Potato Production Sep 28, 2009 438-012
Specialty Crop Profile: Asparagus
Asparagus, (Asparagus officinalis), is a hardy perennial vegetable belonging to the Lily Family. It is grown for its succulent early spring vegetative shoots that originate from an underground crown (Figure 1). Nutritionally, asparagus is almost 92 percent water, and it provides fairly high amounts of carbohydrates, vitamin A, riboflavin, niacin, thiamine, and phosphorus. A native of coastal Europe, asparagus has naturalized over much of the eastern United States. With the assistance of man and birds that have spread the seeds, asparagus can be found in gardens, old homesteads, fencerows, roadsides, and railroad right of ways across the state. It is well adapted to most of Virginia, preferring well-drained loam soils and easily tolerating winter cold and summer heat. Asparagus is long lived, and a well-managed planting can last 10 to 15 years. For those considering it as a potential crop, good planning and soil preparation are essential for long-term success.
Jan 28, 2015 438-102 (HORT-91P)
Specialty Crop Profile: Globe Artichoke
Globe artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) is an herbaceous perennial that is grown for its tender, edible, immature flower buds. The globe artichoke should not be confused with Jerusalem artichoke, another member of the composite family native to North America, which is grown for its fleshy tubers. Globe artichoke plants can become large: four to five feet tall and wide, with long, heavily serrated silvery green leaves (Figure 1a).
Jan 28, 2015 438-108 (HORT-92P)
Forced-Air Produce Cooler
Field heat removal from freshly harvested produce is critical for subsequent handling and storage. Heat removal should be done immediately after harvest to maximize storage potential of the produce. The longer heat removal is delayed, the shorter the shelf life. Force air cooling has been design to remove field heat to bring the produce temperature down to the storage temperature.
Jan 28, 2015 442-060 (AREC-118P)
Interpreting Yield Maps - "I gotta yield map - now what?" May 1, 2009 442-509
Pepper Maggot in Sweet (Bell) Pepper May 1, 2009 444-005
European Corn Borer in Sweet (Bell) Pepper May 1, 2009 444-006
Diamondback Moth in Virginia May 1, 2009 444-007
Bean Leaf Beetle Biology and Management in Snap Beans May 1, 2009 444-009
Colorado Potato Beetle May 1, 2009 444-012
Fall Armyworm in Vegetable Crops May 1, 2009 444-015
Soybean Disease Control: Response of Soybeans to Foliar Sprays of Fungicides in 2005 May 1, 2009 450-561
Sources of Lime for Acid Soils in Virginia
Acid soil limits crop yields on many Virginia farms. This soil acidity can be directly toxic to plants, but more often it reduces the plants' efficiency at nutrient utilization.
May 1, 2009 452-510
2017 Mid-Atlantic Commercial Vegetable Production Recommendations
New varieties and strains of vegetables are constantly being developed throughout the world and it is impossible to list and describe all of them, only those that are available and are adapted to the mid-Atlantic region are listed in this publication.
Mar 6, 2017 456-420 (AREC-203P)
IMPACT: Virginia Potato Disease Advisory Impact
Potatoes are a major food crop on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, with average annual cash receipts of $14 million (2011-13).
Nov 13, 2014 ANR-105P
2015 Virginia OnFarm Soybean Test Plots
These demonstration and research plot results are a collaborative effort of Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE) Agents and Specialists, area producers, and agribusiness. The purpose of this publication is to provide researchbased information to aid in the decisionmaking process for soybean producers in Virginia.
Jan 25, 2016 ANR-177NP
2017 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
The primary considerations when selecting peanut varieties are yield, grade factors, disease, pests, and drought and heat response. A good practice is recording for each field the variety, yield, rainfall, and disease and insect incidence every year. This will allow producers to identify the most productive and less problematic fields, also the most productive varieties for each field.
Feb 17, 2017 AREC-117NP
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2016
Proper soil fertility management ensures sufficient nutrients for maximum cotton production. Obtaining and maintaining appropriate soil nutrient concentrations is imperative, as fertilizer inputs are the largest component of production budgets for Virginia cotton farmers. At the same time, excessive nutrient application wastes money, wastes natural resources, and can negatively impact yields and environmental quality.
Feb 22, 2016 AREC-124NP (AREC-165NP)
2014 Cotton Variety Testing and On-Farm Results
The official cotton variety testing program (OVT) evaluates the performance of commercial and experimental cotton varieties. Varieties were tested at three non-irrigated locations during 2014. All locations were planted using a two row Seed Research Equipment Solutions Classic Aire planter. All locations were harvested using a 2-row John Deere 9930 cotton picker modified with a system to collect cotton in mesh bags for weighing. The 2014 OVT received 51 entries from five seed companies. Each company was charged an entry fee for each hybrid per location entered. Five extra varieties were entered in the Suffolk trial #1 location as part of a regional variety testing program protocol.
Jan 30, 2015 AREC-131NP
2016 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
Recommendations for the use of agricultural chemicals are included in this publication as a convenience to the reader. The use of brand names and any mention or listing of commercial products or services in this publication does not imply endorsement by Virginia Tech nor discrimination against similar products or services not mentioned. Individuals who use agricultural chemicals are responsible for ensuring that the intended use complies with current regulations and conforms to the product label. Be sure to obtain information about usage regulations and examine a current product label before applying any chemical.
Jan 28, 2016 AREC-157NP
Middleburg Agricultural Research and Extension Center Jul 8, 2016 AREC-187NP
Increasing Fresh Produce Availability From Local Sources
In 2012, several partners came together for a unified mission, “to both educate and provide locally grown fresh produce” to citizens of the Eastern Shore of Virginia (Fig. 1). The best way to fight hunger and provide locally sourced fresh vegetables is to demonstrate proper production practices and teach citizens where they can find information that they need to be successful in their gardens.
Jul 19, 2013 AREC-50NP
2014 Virginia Peanut Production Guide
The primary considerations when selecting peanut varieties are yield, grade factors, disease, pests, and drought and heat response. A good practice is recording for each field the variety, yield, rainfall, and disease and insect incidence every year. This will allow producers to identify the most productive and less problematic fields, also the most productive varieties for each field.
May 2, 2014 AREC-58NP
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2014
Proper soil fertility management ensures sufficient nutrients for maximum cotton production. Obtaining and maintaining appropriate soil nutrient concentrations is imperative, as fertilizer inputs are the largest component of production budgets for Virginia cotton farmers. At the same time, excessive nutrient application wastes money, wastes natural resources, and can negatively impact yields and environmental quality.
Feb 7, 2014 AREC-62NP
Southeastern U.S. 2016 Vegetable Crop Handbook
New varieties and strains of particular varieties of vegetables are constantly being developed throughout the world. Since it is impossible to list and describe all of them, only some of the better performing commercial types are listed in the specific crop section, either alphabetically or in order of relative maturity from early to late. These varieties are believed to be suitable for commercial production under most conditions.
Feb 22, 2017 AREC-66NP (AREC-169NP)
Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center Jul 8, 2016 AREC-81NP (AREC-182NP)
Nitrogen and Sulfur Leaching Potential in Virginia
Early summer often means locally heavy and sporadic rainfall as thunderstorms deliver intense rains, and 2015 appears to be no different with many areas in eastern Virginia receiving 3+ inches of rain in a few days (Figure 1). These storms also often coincide with the timing of sidedress nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) applications on corn. While some rainfall after sidedress is very beneficial to facilitate N movement into soil, heavy rain (2+ inches) often leaves us wondering how much, if any, of that recently-applied N remains and if additional N is needed.
Jun 19, 2015 CSES-125NP
The Nutrient Value of Straw
The mature and dried stem, leaves, and chaff remaining after barley and wheat are harvested is known as straw. Many farmers around Virginia harvest straw by baling in small bales, large round bales, or large square bales that range in weight from 40 to 1,000 lbs. plus per bale.
Jun 19, 2015 CSES-126NP
Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizer Materials: Nitrogen Stabilizers
The recent increase in fertilizer costs, especially nitrogen fertilizers, has resulted in technologies that may improve nitrogen use efficiencies in agronomic cropping systems. Many of these technologies are designed as fertilizer additives to increase fertilizer use efficiencies by increasing plant fertilizer uptake and crop yields. The resulting fertilizer formulations include some type of extra additive within the formulation or applied as a coating and are often referred to as “enhanced efficiency fertilizers” (EEFs).
Aug 22, 2013 CSES-52P
2014 Arthropod Pest Management Research On Vegetable in Virginia
This booklet contains arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in eastern Virginia in 2014. Research was conducted at several
Apr 22, 2015 ENTO-127NP
Insecticide and Acaricide Research on Vegetables in Virginia 2016
This booklet contains arthropod pest management research conducted on vegetable crops in eastern Virginia in 2016. Research was conducted at several locations in Virginia including: 1) the Virginia Tech Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center (AREC) near Painter, VA.
Dec 14, 2016 ENTO-229NP