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Selecting Landscape Plants: Shade Trees

ID

426-610 (HORT-104P)

Authors as Published

Diane Relf, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech; Bonnie Appleton, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech; Reviewed by David Close, Consumer Horticulture and Master Gardener Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech

    Cover, Selecting Landscape Plants: Shade Trees

This publication is available in PDF format only.

Trees are the basic element for any landscape plan. They set the stage for the entire home grounds design. The type used and their location determine to a great extent what other plantings are appropriate. Providing shade usually requires tall, sturdy, long-living species. Density of foliage, which determines the amount of shading, is important. A tree such as a Norway maple will produce a very dense shade that prevents other plants from growing under it, while a honey locust will produce a light partial shade which is not a hindrance to other plants growing below it. Deciduous trees should be used to shade the south windows of a home in the summer, thus allowing the sun to penetrate in the winter.

Rights


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, re-print, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.

Publisher

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; Jewel E. Hairston, Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State, Petersburg.

Date

April 1, 2015