Resources by W. Hunter Frame

Title Available As Summary Date ID Author
Prevention and Control of Palmer Amaranth in Cotton
Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri), a member of the "pigweed" family, is one of the most troublesome weeds in many southern row crops. Seed can germinate all season and plants can grow to over 6 feet in height. Plants have either male flowers that shed pollen or female flowers that can produce up to 600,000 seed per plant. One Palmer amaranth per 30 foot of row can reduce cotton yield by 6 to 12%.
Mar 25, 2015 2805-1001 (PPWS-60NP)
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2016
Proper soil fertility management ensures sufficient nutrients for maximum cotton production. Obtaining and maintaining appropriate soil nutrient concentrations is imperative, as fertilizer inputs are the largest component of production budgets for Virginia cotton farmers. At the same time, excessive nutrient application wastes money, wastes natural resources, and can negatively impact yields and environmental quality.
Feb 22, 2016 AREC-124NP (AREC-165NP)
2014 Cotton Variety Testing and On-Farm Results
The official cotton variety testing program (OVT) evaluates the performance of commercial and experimental cotton varieties. Varieties were tested at three non-irrigated locations during 2014. All locations were planted using a two row Seed Research Equipment Solutions Classic Aire planter. All locations were harvested using a 2-row John Deere 9930 cotton picker modified with a system to collect cotton in mesh bags for weighing. The 2014 OVT received 51 entries from five seed companies. Each company was charged an entry fee for each hybrid per location entered. Five extra varieties were entered in the Suffolk trial #1 location as part of a regional variety testing program protocol.
Jan 30, 2015 AREC-131NP
2015 Cotton Variety Testing and On-Farm Results
The official cotton variety testing program (OVT) evaluates the performance of commercial and experimental cotton varieties. Varieties were tested at four non-irrigated locations during 2015. All locations were All locations were planted using a two row Seed Research Equipment Solutions Classic Aire planter. All locations were harvested using a 2-row commercial cotton picker modified with a system to collect cotton in mesh bags for weighing or weigh on picker with electronic scales. The 2015 OVT received 33 entries from five seed companies. Each company was charged an entry fee for each hybrid per location entered. Eight extra varieties were entered in the Suffolk-TAREC location as part of a regional variety testing program protocol.planted using a two row Seed Research Equipment Solutions Classic Aire planter.
Feb 4, 2016 AREC-166NP
2016 Cotton Variety Testing and On-Farm Results Feb 23, 2017 AREC-204NP
2016 Pre-Commercial Evaluation of ENLIST® Varieties in the Southeastern US Feb 23, 2017 AREC-205NP
Planting Considerations and Variety Performance for Virginia Cotton Producers Mar 11, 2013 AREC-43NP
Virginia Cotton Production Guide 2014
Proper soil fertility management ensures sufficient nutrients for maximum cotton production. Obtaining and maintaining appropriate soil nutrient concentrations is imperative, as fertilizer inputs are the largest component of production budgets for Virginia cotton farmers. At the same time, excessive nutrient application wastes money, wastes natural resources, and can negatively impact yields and environmental quality.
Feb 7, 2014 AREC-62NP
2014 Virginia Bollgard II Xtendflex Variety Trial
Lint yield and fiber quality of commercially available cotton varieties and experimental lines of Bollgard II XtendFlex tested in 2014 in Suffolk, VA.
Apr 29, 2015 CSES-113NP
The Nutrient Value of Straw
The mature and dried stem, leaves, and chaff remaining after barley and wheat are harvested is known as straw. Many farmers around Virginia harvest straw by baling in small bales, large round bales, or large square bales that range in weight from 40 to 1,000 lbs. plus per bale.
Jun 19, 2015 CSES-126NP
Yellow Corn in Virginia – Spring 2016
Many of the corn fields on the Eastern Shore and in Eastern Virginia are “yellow” and stunted due to the weather this Spring (Figs. 1 and 2) and is similar to conditions that Virginia farmers experienced in Spring 2010. There are many reasons for the corn to be yellow that range from nutrient deficiencies to abiotic factors.
Oct 10, 2016 CSES-171NP
Yellow Corn in Virginia – Spring 2017
According to Meteorologist Scott Minnick with the NOAA-National Weather Service in Wakefield, VA, May 2017 is “yet another wet and cloudy May for the record books. With the rain on [May 31, 2017], Norfolk moved up to the 3rd wettest May on record.” The 2017 growing year is almost identical to last year (the wettest May on record for Norfolk, VA), with a dry March and April leading into a record breaking cool and wet May as corn tries to establish roots. Young corn largely depends on residual and starter fertilizer prior to sidedress applications and these fractions can be impacted greatly with excessive rain.
Jul 10, 2017 CSES-193NP
Enhanced Efficiency Fertilizer Materials: Nitrogen Stabilizers
The recent increase in fertilizer costs, especially nitrogen fertilizers, has resulted in technologies that may improve nitrogen use efficiencies in agronomic cropping systems. Many of these technologies are designed as fertilizer additives to increase fertilizer use efficiencies by increasing plant fertilizer uptake and crop yields. The resulting fertilizer formulations include some type of extra additive within the formulation or applied as a coating and are often referred to as “enhanced efficiency fertilizers” (EEFs).
Aug 22, 2013 CSES-52P
Cotton Harvest Aid Cheat Sheet Aug 28, 2013 CSES-65NP