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Trees for Problem Landscape Sites -- Air Pollution


430-022 (HORT-123P)

Authors as Published

Bonnie Appleton, Extension Specialist, Joel Koci, Graduate Student, Hampton Roads AREC, Roger Harris, Kathy Sevebeck, Dawn Alleman, Lynnette Swanson,, Editorial Contributors, Virginia Tech Dept. of Horticulture, Virginia Tech College of Natural Resources, Norfolk VCE, Chesapeake VCE, respectively, Reviewed by David Close, Consumer Horticulture and Master Gardener Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia Tech
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This publication is available in a PDF file format only

Conditions in urban environments place trees under numerous stresses including compacted soil, soil moisture extremes, and reduced soil fertility. Polluted air is another stress that contributes to the decline of urban trees. Air pollution may cause short-term (acute) damage, which is immediately visible, and long-term (chronic) damage, which can lead to gradual tree decline. Long-term damage may predispose trees to other disorders, making diagnosis difficult. 


Virginia Cooperative Extension materials are available for public use, re-print, or citation without further permission, provided the use includes credit to the author and to Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, and Virginia State University.


Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia State University, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture cooperating. Edwin J. Jones, Director, Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg; M. Ray McKinnie, Interim Administrator, 1890 Extension Program, Virginia State University, Petersburg.


April 8, 2015